Wayne State University

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Prescription Drug / Mail Order Information

 Changes in our health insurance plan have generated questions about the differences between generic drugs and their brand-name equivalents. We hope you find the following information helpful.

1. What are generic drugs?
A generic drug is identical, or bioequivalent to a brand-name drug in dosage form, safety, strength, route of administration, quality, performance characteristics and intended use.

2. Are generic drugs as safe as brand-name drugs?
Health professionals and consumers can be assured that Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved generic drugs have met the same rigid standards as the brand-name drug. To gain FDA approval, a generic drug must: contain the same active ingredients as the brand-name drug (inactive ingredients may vary); be identical in strength, dosage form, and route of administration; have the same use indications; be bioequivalent; meet the same batch requirements for identity, strength, purity, and quality, and be manufactured under the same strict standards of FDA's good manufacturing practice regulations required for brand-name products.

3. Why are generic drugs less expensive?
Generic drugs are less expensive because generic manufacturers do not have the investment costs—including research, development, marketing, and promotion— of the developer of a new drug. In addition, once generic drugs are approved, there is greater competition, which keeps the price down. In fact, brand-name firms are linked to an estimated 50 percent of generic drug production. They frequently make copies of their own or other brand-name drugs but sell them without the brand-name.

4. If brand-name drugs and generic drugs have the same active ingredients, why do they look different?
In the United States, trademark laws do not allow a generic drug to look exactly like the brand-name drug. However, a generic drug must duplicate the active ingredient. Colors, flavors, and certain other inactive ingredients may be different.

Mail Order
Our plans offer mail order pharmacy services. Mail service saves time and money by eliminating monthly trips to the pharmacy. If you use the same medication daily, then it is probably a maintenance drug. Maintenance drugs are those prescription drugs that your doctor anticipates will be required for at least six months to treat a chronic condition such as arthritis, high cholesterol, depression, high blood pressure, diabetes and ulcers, for example.

By working with your doctor, you can get a 3-month supply of your medication for the cost of one co-payment. Please note: Total Health Care offers a 3-month supply of your medication for the cost of two co-payments.

To take advantage of the mail order service most health care programs require you to register by completing a member profile to establish an account. Enrollment forms are available online or by mail by contacting the provider (see table below). The Total Compensation and Wellness office has the enrollment form for Pharmacare Direct, the DMC Care mail-order service provider.

We direct you to the following websites and/or customer service departments for full information and directions on how to take advantage of the mail-order services available with our different health care providers.

 

Health Care Provider

Mail Order Provider

Retail Provider

Blue Care Network

 

Medco
800-778-0735

Blue Care Network
800-662-6667
 

Community Blue
 

Medco
800-778-0735 
 

Blue Cross Blue Shield
800-322-4447

Blue Cross Blue Shield
 

Medco
800-778-0735 
 

Blue Cross Blue Shield
800-322-4447

DMC Care

 

CVS Caremark
888-797-8903

CVS Caremark
888-797-8903

Health Alliance Plan

 

Pharmacy Advantage
800-456-2112
 

Health Alliance Plan
313-872-8100
 

Total Health Care
 

 

Catalyst Rx
877-634-9202

Total Health Care
800-862-2862